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Netgear’s Arlo Q Security Cam is a Winner

 

I’ve had quite a few different IP/Security Cameras from various vendors like D-Link, Foscam, Insteon, etc. going back to my first IP based wifi camera that was an 802.11b DCS1000W from D-Link. The early cameras were for geeks only (like me) and required knowledge of networking protocols like port forwarding and more to get the most out of these first and second generation cameras.

IP Cameras are now an integral part of Home Security and the field of DIY Security Camera players has grown considerably.

Netgear asked me to take a look at their newest camera, the Arlo Q indoor camera, and provided me with a review sample for this purpose. The TL; DR version of this post is “this is the camera to get”.

Like some of the current crop of cameras, the Arlo Q offers 1080p HD streaming, audio and video motion sensing/alerts, but unlike the other contenders for this market, Arlo Q offers FREE event based 7 day cloud video storage (you can buy more and even set up continuous video recording, but 7 days revolving storage for FREE sets it apart from the others). Plan details are at https://community.netgear.com/t5/Arlo-Knowledge-Base/What-are-the-available-Arlo-subscription-plans-and-how-much/ta-p/88 (my opinion is that the Basic Free Plan is great and should be enough for most folks).

There are multiple ways to actually mount the camera, including a magnetic base for metal surfaces (the mag mount is strong). A nice long power cord (really a long USB adapter and wall wart plug with USB slot) is included. There’s also a wall mount and mounting screws, etc. included in the box, so there’s lots of flexibility.

in the box

Arlo Q can be set up with an iOS or Android app, as well as a browser based app. I used my iPhone and it was quick and simple to set up an account as a new user. This is the first IP camera I’ve used that supports both the 2.4GHz and 5GHz Wi-Fi bands. The camera is a 802.11n device, and I configured it to use the 2.4GHz band even though I have a dual band Netgear Nighthawk 802.11ac router that supports both 2.4 and 5GHz. Connecting to your wireless network is wizard based, including a neat QR code process where you place your phone 8 inches away from the camera which reads the generated QR code, wait for a pleasant chime to signify “success” and wait about 30 seconds while the Wi-Fi network you specified is provisioned and ready to use. While it is ready to use “as is” after this, you can go into settings and fine tune schedules, and you can rename the camera from its default alpha-numeric (useful if you have more than one Arlo camera).

setup

The iPhone app automatically filled in the SSID that my iPhone was connected to, which was a 5GHz 802.11ac band, but since I wanted to test with 2.4GHz, I had to supply the name of that network (no pick list is available, but that won’t be a problem for most people – I just specifically wanted to test on a slower connection to see worst case performance).

There’s a scheduler that allows you full control of arming/disarming the triggered detection recordings and alerts, or you can leave armed/disarmed. Usage will depend on camera location and the kind of traffic you expect and when you expect it.

The video quality is superb. There was hardly any lag on the 2.4GHz connection using Live view. While there’s no PTZ (pan and tilt) the field of view is very very wide and gives more than enough coverage (and this avoids the device being much heavier).

field of view

Unlike the other cameras of this type, Arlo Q also has user configurable “activity zones” that let you customize three locations that will trigger alerts. It was easy to configure these by dragging the zone around visually on my iPhone. This camera supports two-way audio, so if you’re in another room or miles away, you can kick the dog off the sofa. Alerts arrive by e-mail nearly instantly. The email includes a still image from the captured video and a link to view the full captured video event in your library.

email alert

Sample Video Capture (see the high quality!):

 

You can add “friends” to your Arlo account per the user guide “Friends can view live streams from your cameras, record video clips, view, share, mark as favorite, and delete clips from your library, and take snapshots. Friends can be granted limited access to some of the settings and features on your Arlo account. You can select which cameras friends can see (if you have multiple cameras) and what administrative rights are available to them“, so you don’t need to share your credentials will your kids but you can let them access features.

I really like Arlo Q and highly recommend it.

Get MMS Alerts from Insteon Cameras

 

I’ve got a great set up for Home Automation and Security, thanks to my Insteon devices and software, including the newly released Windows 8 Insteon for Hub App. While I can set up my motion sensors to send email and text/SMS notifications from within both the iOS and Windows 8 apps, currently there is no way to configure alerts from the Insteon Indoor 75790 cameras. These cameras support both video and audio alerts, and I’d love to see  an interface for configuring this, as well as other advanced features, inside the Insteon for Hub apps.

I sat down this morning to figure out how to do this, and it was extremely easy.

Start by logging into the web interface for your camera. You’ll need the IP and the Port you configured (don’t leave these cameras configured on Port 80). In other words, open your web browser and go to the address that looks like http://192.168.0.114:25114 that you set up when you configured your camera. Log in with your configured username and password.

Next, navigate to the Mail Service Settings to configure the sender account and the receiver. You can designate multiple receivers, so you can send text, SMS and MMS or whatever combination suits your needs.

I tested sending with both a Comcast and a Gmail address. Comcast’s SMTP server is smtp.comcast.net and Google’s is smtp.gmail.com. Both require the same settings, use port 587, STARTTLS, and need authentication. Configure your Receiver(s). For MMS, use your 10 digit phone number and your carriers email to SMS gateway address which you can normally find at your carrier’s web site. There is a large list at http://www.tech-faq.com/how-to-send-text-messages-free.html but I don’t know how current/accurate it is. For example, you can’t send images to Verizon phones via MMS using vtext.com. You can, however, do this with vzwpix.com.

set email for mms

When you’ve finished configuring your mail and receiver settings, select Submit, then navigate to Alarm Service Settings

turn motion detection on

Check Motion Detection Alarmed and select Submit. Return to the Mail Service Settings and then select Test to insure your configuration is correct.

Here is a sample of a received MMS alert:

 

 sms received

I’d really like to see the ability to configure these alerts included in the various Insteon Apps, so that everything is part of a single, easily accessible interface.

Insteon Windows 8.1 App Fixed with Update

 

Yesterday, I wrote about my disappointment with the initial release of the Insteon for Hub App that was released to the Windows Store. An update was made available early this morning to the app which fixed both the inability to login and the non connect camera issue. Note that if you install the app, you should also immediately check for an update to insure you have the fixme version. Open the Windows Store, select Charms, Settings, App Updates to do this.

insteon fixed

Above image shows one of my cameras in the Windows 8.1 app interface. I can pan and tilt, etc. and also hear the audio on my Windows 8.1 devices.

While I’d like to see some GUI improvements and some usability enhancements, it’s a great first step.

 

Insteon’s Director of Marketing reached out to me today (a great sign that they’re serious about insuring a great end user experience). It appears that for whatever reason, the first version uploaded to the Windows Store was not designated ready for release and the folks at Microsoft fast tracked it through certification (which makes some sense as Microsoft is now selling the Insteon hardware online as of today.

I’m a big fan of Insteon products. With the new Microsoft+Insteon partnership, you should look seriously at Insteon products for Home Automation and Security.

I’ll be writing more about Insteon in the near future.

Updating My Home Automation and Security System

 

A couple of years ago, I wrote a series of posts detailing my roll your own home automation and security system. A recently failed Insteon SmartLinc 2412N Network controller (the brains of the system) forced me to replace the device and provided the opportunity to add some components and address the issue of controlling everything from a Windows RT device. It turns out that the 24112N has been failing for many others, right after the expiration of the 2 year warranty and is no longer available from Insteon. As I was already invested in Insteon modules and devices, I didn’t want to start fresh with a different technology (and I was happy with Insteon), so I ordered an Insteon Smart Hub from Amazon (best price at the time that I ordered) as well as a pair of Insteon 79750 IP Cameras.

As with the earlier (and now discontinued 2412N) there are apps for iOS and Android (but not for Windows). I use an iPhone, so I have no problems controlling my devices from my phone. With the new iPhone App, not only can I control my lights, but I can pan and tilt my Insteon cameras.

insteon iphone app

Although I I can control the lights, and the Insteon cameras  as shown in the image above, I can’t control or view the D-Link cameras. Insteon has a beta web portal for remote/local management, but it sadly uses an unsigned ActiveX control (which also means the web site won’t work on an RT device like the Lumia 2520). The phone apps (and obviously the web portal) therefore depend on a vendor web site that I don’t control (as well as Internet connectivity). Unlike the 2412N, the embedded web server in the Insteon Hub does not offer controls. I also use a Nokia Lumia 2520 and I was determined to be able to use it for Home Security and Control. Bottom line, I needed better control and as important, didn’t want to depend on someone else keeping a server running.

 

Controlling the Lights from Windows/Windows RT

I found that Insteon devices could be controlled by passing parameters directly to a device from a web browser and found a great source for these commands. Note that in current versions of IE, you can no longer pass credentials via an http URL for security reasons, but sending commands without credentials does produce a prompt for them. I quickly built myself an app (which can be installed locally with a developer’s license) to control the lights with Microsoft Project Siena. To insure that I could use these controls both locally and while away, instead of using the local LAN IP, I used my DDNS hostname and the port that the Insteon hub uses (which is set up in my router’s port forwarding table).

The basic On/Off commands I used were:

On
http://[dynamic DNS hostname goes here]:25105/3?026218EF6C0F11FF=I=3
 
Off
http://[dynamic DNS hostname goes here]:25105/3?026218EF6C0F1300=I=3

 

I created a simple interface in about 60 seconds to control some lighting with Project Siena:

barbs siena app

It took less than 15 minutes to create this simple app which is now installed on all my Windows 8.1 devices. I can add Dim and Brighten commands as well. No one has uncovered any Scene commands, but for my needs, what I have now is sufficient for basic functions.

Viewing and Controlling the Cameras from Windows/Windows RT

The video formats for most of the currently available IP cameras requires an ActiveX control or stand alone app to render the video/audio feed. Setting up these cameras from a computer also sometimes requires installing an ActiveX control (some of them are unsigned and require permission changes in IE which I won’t accept). In many cases, once you decline the install, you can proceed with configuring the cameras, you just can’t view the video feeds. Most cameras (like my D-Link and Insteon cams) have a static image jpg feed; but a "live action" video feed is always the better choice, if available.

The original iPhone App for my original Insteon 2412N allowed me to configure non Insteon devices, so I was able to add the D-Link cameras and view from within the iPhone App. That is not the case with the new app for the Insteon Hub. Plus, once again, I wanted something to view the cameras in Windows 8.1  I decided on IP CamView for Windows 8. This app supports Pan and Tilt as well as Presets (on supported cameras). Note that the Insteon 75790 uses the same settings as a Foscam FI8918W. Once again, the trick to use this app remotely is to use a Dynamic DNS hostname as opposed to a local LAN IP.

Main View IP CamView:

ip cam main view

 

Detail View IP CamView showing Pan and Tilt Settings and Preset drop down menu.

ipcam camera view

Home Security and Access to Features using Windows/Windows RT

If you’ve read my earlier Home Automation/Security posts, you know that I’ve been using Blue Iris to manage my IP Security Cameras as opposed to setting up each individual camera for alerts, email notifications, etc. etc. and great scheduling capabilities. It certainly meets my needs. There have been lots of updates – nearly weekly – to the Blue Iris software and it supports nearly every IP Camera on the market. While there was no listing for My Insteon cameras, but they use the same settings as a Foscam FI8918W, and Blue Iris works perfectly with my Insteon and my D-Link cameras.

blue iris pc

Blue Iris can be accessed over the web via browser (and DDNS), but also requires an ActiveX control. I had been using RDP to the host desktop from my Windows RT devices. After searching the Windows Store, I was surprised, but pleased, to find a program called Blue Iris Companion.

Blue Iris Companion in addition to viewing live camera streams, shows alerts and recorded clips.

blue iris companion

Viewing a single camera in Blue Iris Companion provides an interface for PTZ commands and presets.

blue iris companion detail view

All in all, I’m extremely happy with my upgraded Home Automation/Security System.

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